Glamping in the USA as a romantic vacation

There are many trends in travel, let alone life in general. Some travel trends come and go rather quickly, like different types of suitcases or destination festivals. Other travel trends, like different places to visit, seem to last a bit longer, and sometimes even come out of the trend ‘phase' and become successful hotspots that attract visitors for years and years. One travel trend that seems to be doing really well and doesn't look like it'll fade out anytime soon is glamping. As you can imagine, the term glamping refers to camping, but with a luxury twist. This form of accommodation has made our list of the best romantic holiday ideas for couples. This is because, even though anyone can go glamping, most of glamping options air on the side of romantic.

But what can you expect when glamping? Where can you go glamping within the United States, and above all, how much does luxury camping really cost? To find out more about this newer accommodation option, continue reading below.

What is glamping

Essentially, glamping is a term that refers to camping in a more glamorous setting. Some even refer to it as luxury camping, though not as commonly. When looking through glamping pictures, you won't find simple tents stationed next to cars in a national forest but rather huts, tree houses, yurts, airstreams, trailers, small cabin like structures, tents with structured foundations, and pretty much anything small, eco-friendly and unique.

For romantic couples, glamping is one of the best options out there, especially if at least one person loves being in the outdoors. This is because privacy is one of the biggest characteristics of glamping, partly because you won't be housed in a hotel or resort room. Instead you'll find yourself in your unique accommodation surrounded by nature and lots of personal space. This large amount of personal space is one of the best reasons that explains the popularity of glamping.

Are all glamping accommodations the same

Much unlike a hotel chain where all (or most) of the rooms look the same and offer the same amenities, in the world of glamping you'll find ‘resorts' and individual accommodation options that vary widely from one to the next. You'd be very hard pressed to find options that are exact replicas of other glamping options. Some options are very small, and designed for one person instead of a couple, while other options are actually quite large, and can house a group or a family. Some options are ground based like regular accommodations while others are perched over the side of a hill, cliff, or in a tree.

Because glamping varies so much, you can really have fun deciding which style to holiday at. But, all in all, you will notice one big similarity, a rustic down to earth feel. That's because glamping, although luxurious in its own right, is designed to offer lots of comfort in a earthy setting.

Where in the United States can you go glamping

Glamping is now widely popular, and extends pass US borders and into the rest of the world, making it so that, if you'd like, you can glamp in other countries any time you visit. However, if you plan on staying within the US for your glamping experience, you'll be far from disappointed with the options available. This is because they are pretty much endless.

Romantic couples who love the idea of sleeping next to the sea, a lake, or a river will find it very easy to do. This is true for both the east coast and the west, as well as in the mountains or next to the Great Lakes. Those who rather venture into the forest or woods a bit before settling into their bed will find lots of options as well. Prefer a more arid environment? Glamping has got you covered there as well. Travelers can choose to glamp in a national park or on private land too.

But what are the most popular parts of the US to glamp in? Currently, northern California, Montana, Colorado, Utah, New York, Alaska, and North Carolina hold the top spots for the most popular destination states. This is because of the several unpopulated areas available to glamp in. When travelers glamp, they're looking to be surrounded by nature, instead of close to buildings, towns, and cities. But, if you like the idea of glamping and then traveling to a major city so that you can experience both, then you might want to look into glamping within a short drive of San Francisco or New York City, both of which are popular with glampers who want to extend their vacation.

When should you glamp

This all depends on what season you like the best, or when you prefer to take vacations due to your work schedule and the like. Because of the extensive variety of glamping options, there is no real glamping season. If you're worried about the elements, say in winter, instead of picking a glamping option that's not well insulated, you'd just want to opt for one that's more of a cabin style instead of a tent style.

One thing you'll want to note however, is that glamping close to or on holidays such as Christmas and the 4th of July will cost a bit more. You'll also find it harder to book accommodations as they'll fill up quicker than if it were a regular weekday or weekend. Speaking of weekends, much like regular hotels, they're more popular to glampers than the weekdays. This is because taking a weekend trip into the woods is becoming more and more popular for young adults living in a city.

To give you a better idea of what's available, we're also breaking down glamping options into seasons.

Winter

Winter travel in the mainland US brings to mind a small cabin in the woods surrounded by a snowy landscape, unless you venture south to warmer states. With glamping you'll still find plenty of great options that offer stoves, wood burners, and sometimes even heating that radiates from the floor.

Spring

If you're looking into glamping during the springtime, you'll be delighted by the great choices throughout the US, as well as milder temperatures and weather. This time of the year is great for open tent glamping in a glamping resort, unless you're vacationing at a very high elevation where snowy weather is still going strong.

Summer

As long as you have bug spray, summer is a great time to glamp, in any type of structure. Glamping during this time of year will give you lots of hiking and fishing opportunities as well, which may make you decide to book a stay on or very near the water. A great option is a boathouse, or an airstream situated next to a lake.

Fall

A hot cup of coffee in hand, your favorite sweater, and brisk air is what Fall is all about. It's also a fun time of year to stay in a cabin glamping option, or better yet, a treehouse.

Glamping for honeymoons and weddings

Though it may sound a bit strange to some, glamping has now become a popular choice not only for honeymooning couples, but for those who are about to get married as well. The same can be said for their guests, especially if the wedding is a destination wedding on the other side of the US. If you're looking to have your honeymoon right after your wedding and rather not have a destination wedding and then a honeymoon somewhere else, you can easily combine the two with glamping. This gives your guest a nice vacation option as well, especially if the wedding party is glamping in the same ‘resort area' as you.

How much does glamping cost

This is not a simple question simply because of the large amount of different glamping accommodations. But, to give you a general idea of what costs to expect, we've found that the cheaper glamping options start out at around US$60 per night for two people. These include luxury tents that are outfitted with a bed (mattress instead of a sleeping bag), seating area, and minimal decor. Generally speaking, these options are found in a glamping resort and offer guests use of a shared bathhouse and dining area.

As more amenities are added to your glamping experience, and housing that ventures further and further away from a tent look, you'll find the price increases. At the height of the glamping market, you'll find prices reach up to US$1,000+ per night for two people. These more expensive experiences also tend to include food and water, or at the very least a cupboard stocked with spices and a kitchen outfitted with basic cooking and dining supplies. Really, when you look at the glamping selections that are on the highest price ranges, they're really small houses that are as unique looking as they come, and of course surrounded by lots and lots of natural elements.

Pictures from Flickr users Ranch Seeker, Alice Crain, Kurt Johnson, Vaughan McShane, and Zach Korb.




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